Fair Play, Fair Pay

Christopher Sabec Fair Pay, Fair PlayToday marks a historic day in the eyes of the music industry, as four members of Congress introduced a bi-partisan piece of legislation called the “Fair Play, Fair Pay Act of 2015.” The four members of Congress responsible for introducing the legislation were House Democrats Ted Deutch, Jerrold Nadler, and John Conyers Jr. and House Republican Marsha Blackburn. If the act passes, it would require radio stations to pay musicians for their songs played on the radio.  The act would also force all forms of radio to pay royalties on master recordings made after 1972, and do away with discounted rates paid by certain digital services to artists and musicians.

There is a short list of countries that don’t pay their artists for AM/FM radio airplay, and the United States is the only democratic country where this exists. The other countries include North Korea, Iran, Rwanda, Vietnam, and China. The United States has held this position for almost a century, and this act is a step forward towards change in the music industry. Because of the laws instilled in the United States, artists also don’t get paid for their songs played on the radio abroad. Since the US music industry imports more music than they export, the music economy in the US suffers due to this.

The executive director of musicFirst Coalition, Ted Kalo said, “The bill is designated to return the music licensing system to a basic principal of Fair Play, Fair Pay.”  People assume that artists are rich if their music gets played all over the world, but this is not necessarily the case coming from the United States.

5 Misconceptions Regarding Copyright Law

Christopher Sabec trichordist copyright misconceptions1)   If someone is defaming me, I can issue a DMCA takedown – If someone is spreading lies and taking about you without using your copyrighted material, then the Digital Millennium Copyright Act can’t be issued.

2)   It is illegal to write a story using somebody else’s trademark concept – Marvel and DC both own the trademark on the term “superhero,” so small time publishers may not use superhero in the title of their works, but it is perfectly legal for them to mention superheroes in their stories.

3)   Stories can not have the same plot a previously copyrighted story –  Copyright law protects the way in which the idea is portrayed, not the actual idea itself. You can have a masked vigilantly fighting crime in New York City, but if he has a fondness for bats, looks like batman, and is a wealthy Christian Bale character during the day, then the court can decide that this is Batman and violates copyright law.

4)   There is no reason to register your work as copyrighted material anymore – It is a lot easier for register your work as copyrighted material than it was 30 years ago. Before, it was mandatory to include a copyright notice if you wanted to register your work under copyright law. Today, any work that you create automatically belongs to you with or without the copyright notice. Registering your copyrighted material and obtaining a notice; however, deters people from copying your work and lets other know who to contact for licensing purposes.

5) Anyone can post a cover of a copyrighted song on YouTube – If you decide that you want to post a cover on YouTube of a copyrighted song, then you must acquire a synchronization license from the copyright holder.