Piracy in the Music Industry

Christopher Sabec Piracy in the Music IndustryFor artists, musicians, and production software developers, piracy has been a steadfast concern for a number of years. Despite preventative measures and regular advancements in online security, pirates maintain to be crafty. As are most, the issue of online media piracy is a two sided argument. On one hand, access to pirated media and software allows composers and media consumers with limited resources to access a viable platform for their work and the music, TV shows, and movies they like to view. On the other hand, piracy deprives software developers and artists of the opportunity to profit from their work, and may discourage future advancements and creative contributions.

Many pirates justify stealing software and media online and sharing it freely by offering the argument that the record companies, studios, and creators of respective software are getting fat off the profit. In some cases, this is true. Musicians only see a fraction of the profit from retail album sales, accruing most of their income from live performances and merchandise they sell personally. Major software companies like Adobe, Microsoft, and Oracle make insane amounts of profit, and to them, pirated software is little more than a drop out of the bucket. But most software companies are small, indepently owned businesses, and rely on software sales to stay afloat. Software often comes with an off-putting price tag, but this often has a lot to do with having to account for piracy in pricing the product.

Pirates also make the claim that media is overpriced, but often overlook the cost of producing the media. The bill associated with studio time for tracking, mixing, and mastering music adds up quickly, and pressing music to a physical medium racks up a hefty bill as well. It should be common knowledge that after paying cast, crew, production studios, composers, directors, etc., movies and television shows often dish out copious amounts of cash in creating film based media. While piracy poses a major threat to lesser known film studios and artists, on the other hand, major studios make millions of dollars from ticket sales at the box office, contracts with Netflix, Redbox, and Hulu, and DVD and Bluray sales.

Controversial by nature, piracy does hinder many artists and software producers from earning due profit from their work. My word of advice to pirates is to consider the producers of the software and media you enjoy, and encourage them to continue creating good products.