Performance Rights Organizations

What are Performing Rights Organizations? from Christopher Sabec on Vimeo.

In this presentation, we give an overview of PRO’s (Performance Rights Organizations). Discussing the 3 major ones (ASCAP, BMI and SESAC), this is an introduction to the work that they do and the necessity of their existence.

Beyond the Blockchain: It’s All About The Beans

By Alan Graham

Since I wrote my last piece on deciphering the importance of blockchain without the hype, the hype machine has actually kicked it up several notches. I feel it has gotten so ridiculously far out of hand it is time to bring some additional context to the discussion and take it down a peg, because the overabundance of passion is lacking a fair amount of context. And I’m saying this as someone who uses the blockchain daily.

We need to temper our approach to blockchain because frankly, I’ve seen many pie in the sky ideas run up this flagpole lately with the flag being that of Fair Trade Music (this will solve everything!), but not a lot of discussion of what it actually means, how it will function, how to get buy in from every major/minor player and artist and songwriter etc. in the music industry, and then the most important factor of all, convince listeners. We all see the iceberg, and there is still time to turn the ship before it hits, yet I keep seeing people ready to jump in rowboats and proclaim, “we did all we can”.

Blockchain, for all of what it could do, will not solve the underlying issue that all kinds of creators are facing. That issue is societal. It is at the very heart of everything, and no amount of talk about blockchain, improved transparency, or fair trade is going to change what is ultimately broken.

It’s us…we’re broken.

The full article can be found on The Trichordist Website. Check the link below:

Beyond the Blockchain: It’s All About The Beans

Australian Copyright Amendment

4841330621_2c1e2f7a62_oThe Australian Senate has recently passed a Copyright Amendment (Online Infringement) Bill, which could soon force ISPs to block website which are deemed to be ‘facilitating piracy.’

This new bill will allow copyright holders, such as film studios and record labels, to apply to the Federal Court for an injunction requiring all Australian ISPs to block overseas website facilitating piracy. In order for the website to be blocked, the Rights holders must be able to prove to the court that the primary purpose of the website in question is to facilitate copyright infringement. Furthermore, the court will also factor whether the site’s operator has a “disregard” for copyright and the “flagrancy” of infringement that it allows.

While this law will not really affect anyone in the immediate future, numerous sites that facilitate copyright material may soon disappear. If the court’s order ISPs to block a website, then Australian Internet users will be met with dead ends to these websites, meaning they will no longer be available. The bill is designed to target BitTorrent sites, such as the Pirate Bay, which gives users access to enormous amounts of copyrighted material for free.

If you live in Australia and would like to learn more about how this new bill may affect you then check out this article.

Fair Play, Fair Pay

Christopher Sabec Fair Pay, Fair PlayToday marks a historic day in the eyes of the music industry, as four members of Congress introduced a bi-partisan piece of legislation called the “Fair Play, Fair Pay Act of 2015.” The four members of Congress responsible for introducing the legislation were House Democrats Ted Deutch, Jerrold Nadler, and John Conyers Jr. and House Republican Marsha Blackburn. If the act passes, it would require radio stations to pay musicians for their songs played on the radio.  The act would also force all forms of radio to pay royalties on master recordings made after 1972, and do away with discounted rates paid by certain digital services to artists and musicians.

There is a short list of countries that don’t pay their artists for AM/FM radio airplay, and the United States is the only democratic country where this exists. The other countries include North Korea, Iran, Rwanda, Vietnam, and China. The United States has held this position for almost a century, and this act is a step forward towards change in the music industry. Because of the laws instilled in the United States, artists also don’t get paid for their songs played on the radio abroad. Since the US music industry imports more music than they export, the music economy in the US suffers due to this.

The executive director of musicFirst Coalition, Ted Kalo said, “The bill is designated to return the music licensing system to a basic principal of Fair Play, Fair Pay.”  People assume that artists are rich if their music gets played all over the world, but this is not necessarily the case coming from the United States.

Piracy in the Music Industry

Christopher Sabec Piracy in the Music IndustryFor artists, musicians, and production software developers, piracy has been a steadfast concern for a number of years. Despite preventative measures and regular advancements in online security, pirates maintain to be crafty. As are most, the issue of online media piracy is a two sided argument. On one hand, access to pirated media and software allows composers and media consumers with limited resources to access a viable platform for their work and the music, TV shows, and movies they like to view. On the other hand, piracy deprives software developers and artists of the opportunity to profit from their work, and may discourage future advancements and creative contributions.

Many pirates justify stealing software and media online and sharing it freely by offering the argument that the record companies, studios, and creators of respective software are getting fat off the profit. In some cases, this is true. Musicians only see a fraction of the profit from retail album sales, accruing most of their income from live performances and merchandise they sell personally. Major software companies like Adobe, Microsoft, and Oracle make insane amounts of profit, and to them, pirated software is little more than a drop out of the bucket. But most software companies are small, indepently owned businesses, and rely on software sales to stay afloat. Software often comes with an off-putting price tag, but this often has a lot to do with having to account for piracy in pricing the product.

Pirates also make the claim that media is overpriced, but often overlook the cost of producing the media. The bill associated with studio time for tracking, mixing, and mastering music adds up quickly, and pressing music to a physical medium racks up a hefty bill as well. It should be common knowledge that after paying cast, crew, production studios, composers, directors, etc., movies and television shows often dish out copious amounts of cash in creating film based media. While piracy poses a major threat to lesser known film studios and artists, on the other hand, major studios make millions of dollars from ticket sales at the box office, contracts with Netflix, Redbox, and Hulu, and DVD and Bluray sales.

Controversial by nature, piracy does hinder many artists and software producers from earning due profit from their work. My word of advice to pirates is to consider the producers of the software and media you enjoy, and encourage them to continue creating good products.

 

Independent Record Labels vs. Youtube: The Fight for Money

Christopher Sabec YoutubeIn a recent article by Billboard Biz, Youtube might “take down” music from independent music labels. This is all in light of Youtube’s recent subscription service launch. If the rates that Youtube is offering are not fully compensated for the paid subscription service then Youtube will not be “supporting” them any longer on Youtube’s ad-supported streaming service. A service that pays hundreds of millions of dollars a year to labels and publishers. Not only will this hurt the independent labels that use the site to promote their artists and videos but Youtube will keep the videos up on the site without backing the label with advertisers.
In order to defend themselves, Youtube will stand by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and will only take down the music when they are notified by the rights owner. The independent labels either can take down their music or leave their music on the site with no compensation from Youtube. It is a tricky situation. After the service launch, there have been many independent labels complaining about the way Youtube is handling the situation and they are trying to get government regulatory agencies to look at Youtube’s businesses tactics in the way they set up the subscriptions service. However, not all indie labels are upset with Youtube. Other online streaming services, such as Spotify, don’t give labels the option to be on the premium service rather than the ad-supported part of their model. Labels state that Youtube is “going backwards” with their business model. This means that Youtube built and developed the “free” part of their model first and then figured out how to make money by converting the site to an ad-supported model. On the other hand, other streaming services have offered indie labels lower rates than other established labels. Moving forward, hopefully something can be done to help indie labels not have to suffer when big names like Youtube and spotify want to turn a profit on their content.

Mark Weatherly on Cutting Off Add Revenue to Illegal Downloading Sites

Christopher Sabec on Online PiracyIn a recent article by Music Week, The Prime Minister’s IP Advisor Mark Weatherly believes that ‘cutting off ad revenue to illegal sites is key to the recent piracy battle.’ In a new recent report, Weatherly suggests a number of actions that need to take place by government rights holders, ISP’s and search companies. Some of his recommendations include: increasing funding for the police intellectual property crime unit (PIPCU), exploring the advertising monitor software to ensure compliance of advertising codes, and lastly, requesting the Intellectual Property Office (IPO) look into what additional legislation is necessary to require pre-emptive action by advertisers and payment providers. According to Weatherly: “Following the money is the key to shutting down the vast majority of websites that host illegal material.” The recent report highlights a number of issues surrounding the piracy debate and Weatherley hopes it will spark discussion in the UK and other parts of the world.

Weatherly goes on to comment that since he is the Intellectual Property Advisor to the Prime Minister, he feels like it is his role to shed light to this issue and how damaging it can be, to even the UK economy. Online piracy is a form of stealing not only from the music makers, but also the country that they owe taxes to.  Steve Head, the head of economic crime at City of London Police states that he welcomes the points noted in Weatherley’s report and agrees with him in many ways. He goes on to say, “It is my firm belief that we will only make truly significant inroads into reducing this type of criminality by having a credible and effective police deterrent.” Time will tell if the UK and other countries put an end to online piracy.

This blog post is based off of this music week article posted by the Trichordist blog.
 

 

A Fight Against The Pirate Bay and Illegal Downloading

Christopher Sabec The Pirate BayIn a recent article posted by The Trichordist a website whose mission statement is “artists for an ethical and sustainable internet,” music pirating and how it affects artists is discussed. Lindy Morrison recently received the Ted Albert award at the APRA Music Awards in Brisbane for her contribution to the music industry. She was deeply honored that her work had been recognized, including her work as an advocate musicians’ rights. Morrison has worked for many years to ensure that music creators’ rights have been safeguarded and that they receive compensation when their work is used by others. She states that people want to know all the time “what it takes” to work in the industry. She replies by discussing the length of time is takes to build the skills it takes to create and record songs, the discipline in takes in rehearsals and lastly the management skills in order to keep bands on the road and the constant support and tenacity the bandmates will need throughout the years to keep making music.

In addition to discussion all of these skills, she also asks them to think about copyright laws and how they could affect musicians in protecting their music. She urges her proteges to make sure they are paid, know what their rights are, knowing how their payments are collected and passed  back to them and lastly how to know when their work has been taken without their permission. However, it is difficult, especially for artists in Australia to know/find out when their work has been taken away from them without their permission. It is difficult because it is constantly being done on the internet everyday. Morrison explains that she does not hate the internet, in fact she loves it when people discover her band, the Go-Betweens on the net but that instead of illegally downloading artists music, discovering their music through licensed websites that give back to the artists. In Australia, there is very little a musician can do in order to stop someone from illegally downloading their music. The scamming websites make a lot of money through advertising and don’t give any of it back to the artists.Morrison feels upset when she says her friends and fellow musicians being scammed by these kinds of pirating websites. It is time that people start drawing their focus on how copyright laws can improve and help artists in the future. Morrison believes that more people should support musician’s rights because she wants to see people’s rights being protected in “practical and meaningful ways.” Moving forward, time will tell if this will actually happen.

This blog post is based off of this article.